Ognuno è un Genio, nessuno è un Genio
week_03_july_2019_002.png

Recce’d nel suo Blog pubblica unicamente cose utili: spunti, dati e notizie che il lettore possa utilizzare nelle sue scelte di investimento.

Abituati a leggere, sui media tradizionali, lunghi articoli “contenitore” dove con un abile “tagli ed incolla” si affiancano temi che tra loro hanno poco o nulla in comune, per poi arrivare a conclusioni che lasciano tutte le strade aperte (non si sa mai ..) così che il lettore poi si trova punto e d’accapo, i lettori purtroppo spesso scelgono di rinunciare, di non capire, di lasciare che le cose seguano il loro corso senza reagire.

Lo scopo dei nostri Post è invece quello di offrire al lettore segnali concreti, riferimenti precisi, cose che si possono utilizzare: e tutto questo senza spendere troppe parole.

In questo Post, trovate un esempio concreto, che parte da uno spunto che appartiene dal quotidiano di ognuno di noi : l’italiano va dal medico, e poi una volta uscito dallo studio dice tra sé e sé: “Quello non capisce niente, meglio se faccio da solo”. Le competenze? ma che ci vuole …

Quando si parla di investimenti, questa situazione si ripete ancora più spesso. La diffidenza sale ai massimi livelli, ed ognuno ritiene di poter fare al meglio i propri interessi aggiustandosi da solo. Le competenze? In questo caso proprio non servono, perché chiunque è in grado di capire come funzionano i mercati. Strumenti di analisi? Valutazioni? Informazioni di prima mano e non distorte? Che importa! tanto tutti puntano solo a fregarmi, meglio se mi arrangio con quello che ho, e così risparmio anche quell’1% di commissioni.

Rischiando, così, 10. 20, 30 volte tanto: ma di questo ci si rende conto sempre, e solo, dopo, dopo che si è perso quel 30%. Prima, molti ragionano come segue “è andata bene fino ad oggi, perché dovrei fasciarmi la testa?”.

Naturalmente: e grazie a Powell e la sua Federal Reserve, ed a Draghi ed alla sua BCE, oggi tutti si sentono dei geni: essendo che sale tutto, ma proprio tutto, a galla, anche le porcherie più zozze, allora chiunque è autorizzato a sentirsi un genio. Il pensiero è “sto guadagnando, oggi”.

Tutti sono Geniali, tutti vincono al casinò dei mercati, e quindi per quale ragione preoccuparsi, oggi?

Se poi succede qualcosa di strano, del tipo H2O, lo liquidiamo senza pensarci troppo: tutto il resto sale, e noi siamo tutti diventati dei Geniali investitori.

Decisamente, in Recce’d siamo contrari a questo modo di agire. In Recce’d riteniamo che risultati e rischi si controllano soltanto grazie a metodo, preparazione, competenza, ed informazioni (per forza, direte voi lettori: se no, fareste un altro mestiere).

In Recce’d non trovate i Geniali Investitori: noi lavoriamo. Nessun genio, qui, solo lavoro. Noi siamo certi, anzi certissimi, che questa psicosi collettiva del “ognuno è un Genio” finirà presto, e finirà malissimo.

Perché parliamo oggi di questo tema? Perché vi proponiamo di leggere ancora un articolo pubblicato sul Financial Times in settimana, che prende spunto dalla vicenda dei Fondi Comuni oggi in liquidazione (Woodford, GAM e H2O) per riflettere sul DIY, il do-it-yourself, ovvero proprio l’atteggiamento di chi dice “faccio da solo”.

week_01_July_2019_005.png

For years, I have championed the cause of the DIY investor, urging not only FT Money readers, but friends, family and colleagues to get into the habit of regular saving and investing. Plenty of people don’t. Around one in five of us do not save anything at all, according to a report this week from Scottish Widows. Others fail to save enough. Three-quarters of women and half of men across all age groups admit they are “unprepared for retirement” according to a separate study of 5,000 workers by Close Brothers.

From my anecdotal experience, the biggest barrier to getting started is pretty similar to a DIY project you might be thinking of tackling at home. Whether it’s fixing a leak, or plugging a gap in your retirement savings, you may feel you lack the requisite knowledge or don’t have the right tools for the job. You will probably be concerned about the expense. And you will certainly be worried that your DIY efforts may end in disaster. I confess that I’ve always been terrified of home improvements, putting things off for as long as possible. Yet for all the dust and disruption, I know the pay-off is feeling the benefit of that investment every day. When we replaced our kitchen last year, I said to my husband: “Why didn’t we do this years ago?” (He gave me one of his looks).

Similarly, DIY investors have to take a leap of faith. We hope that by spending less money today, and saving it into a pension or stocks and shares Isa, we will have more to enjoy in the future. Granted, this is a much longer-term project. We also have to invest our time in understanding the best and most tax-efficient way of doing so. But the tools at our disposal — like the tech that powers online investment platforms — make the task simpler and less daunting. It angers me that so many DIY investors are caught up in the Woodford disaster, still unable to access savings inside the £3.5bn Equity Income fund nearly six weeks after it suspended redemptions.

week_03_july_2019_001.png

One of the most popular funds in recent times, it had been championed by investment platforms — notably Hargreaves Lansdown, where over 130,000 customers have around £1bn in limbo. Many have been emailing our money@ft.com mailbox to share their views. One reader, Elizabeth, said she had all but written off the thousands she had invested. “It’s nothing compared to what I lost in Equitable Life, or not getting out of RBS shares before the crash,” she says. “Yet the whole thing is so dispiriting. I imagine many Woodford investors are people like me who, lacking superb occupational pensions, have tried to save and provide a better income in retirement — only to end up getting biffed so many times.” These “biffs” are terrible PR for DIY investing.

The latest blow has got me thinking about the power of “best buy” lists produced by investment platforms. They offer a solution to the biggest barrier — how to get started. If you can’t afford to pay for professional advice, picking from a platform’s list of 50 to 100 recommended funds is much easier than combing through the factsheets of over 3,000. Many platforms also offer ready-made funds. But a careful balance has to be struck. Given the high costs and poor performance of so many, the Woodford wobble might prompt DIY investors to question if they have right tools for the job ahead Claer Barrett Until relatively recently, many lists did not even feature passive funds — the low-cost building blocks of my own DIY portfolio. And although no commission changes hands, the pulling power of these lists is huge. Many active managers featured are prepared to offer platforms a discount on their fees — flattering the cost of the platform’s own charges — a relationship I feel regulators are certain to probe in greater depth. Hargreaves customers are rightly furious it was punting the stricken Equity Income fund in its Wealth 50 list until the moment of its suspension. They found they were not only stuck with a duff investment, but stuck with Hargreaves — as its customers hold a special, discounted Z-class of shares in the fund. Until a U-turn this week, customers had been blocked from transferring their investments to other platforms. HL has since decided to strike two more funds from the Wealth 50 list — but for rather different reasons. The Lindsell Train UK Equity and Global Equity funds will be jettisoned as they collectively own about 12 per cent of Hargreaves Lansdown itself, creating a potential conflict of interest. HL shares fell by as much as 18 per cent following Woodford-gate, but star manager Nick Train has been topping up his holdings. He believes the platform’s reputation will recover in time — shares are now 10 per cent below what they were in early June. Now Woodford investors are unshackled, I wonder how many will vote with their feet? The Woodford and Lindsell Train funds also feature in some of Hargreaves’s own multi-manager funds, which package together (mostly active) funds under different investment themes. A convenient choice for the time-pressed DIY investor, they come at a high price with ongoing annual charges of up to 1.59 per cent — plus HL’s 0.45 per cent platform charge. Ouch. In a note to clients this week, Mr Train said he felt the fallout from Woodford-gate would be “damaging to the whole active management industry”, with DIY investors likely to turn to low-cost passive funds, or become “even warier about investing their savings in any kind of equity vehicle.” It could also dent the huge profits platforms have been able to churn out of their customers by promoting actively managed funds.

Given the high costs and poor performance of so many, the Woodford wobble might prompt DIY investors to question if they have right tools for the job ahead, and view these lists with greater scepticism. Regulators have been making it easier to switch platforms, which could wrench down fees — especially as investors can now go direct to passive providers such as Vanguard for a fraction of the cost. This week, Bestinvest said it would refund up to £500 of exit penalties to investors transferring from rival platforms. Above all, the industry needs to remember that we are not just investing our cash, but investing our trust. Platforms have a vitally important role in bringing investment to the masses, but if we lose faith, the numbers not saving for retirement can only rise.

Claer Barrett is the editor of FT Money, and presents a daily financial news bulletin on Eddie Mair’s LBC drive-time show at 5.30pm:

Larry Fink, i Fondi Comuni e la pubblicità che non si paga
week_04_july_2019_010png.png

Il signore che vedete qui sopra si chiama Larry Fink, è a capo di Blackrock, la più grande Società di Fondi Comuni del Pianeta, ed è un ottimo professionista. Non necessariamente un eroe, però, non un Lancillotto, non un Supereroe della Marvel.

L’articolo che gli è stato dedicato, questa settimana, dal maggiore quotidiano nazionale è imbarazzante.

Una intervista celebrativa (i più critici direbbero: genuflessa) che si apre con la descrizione di Fink come “uomo di Finanza più potente del Mondo”. Una autentica sciocchezza, che dimostra subito che chi intervista non sa che cosa siano i Fondi Comuni e gli ETF.

Potere Fink ne ha, questo è certo: lui, ed il suo esercito di venditori di Fondi Comuni, hanno il potere di occupare in modo militare i media, e quindi di convincere il pubblico dei risparmiatori che “non ci sono alternative”, che loro ed i loro Fondi Comuni dominano il Mondo, e che per il risparmiatore individuale quindi è necessario passare dal promotore finanziario e pagare il 3%-5% di commissioni ogni anno per avere in cambio strumenti che, in cinque casi su sei fanno PEGGIO del mercato. Stiamo parlando di soldi veri, altro che chiacchiere sul debito pubblio: e soldi che escono dalle vostre tasche, amici lettori.

L’articolo lo leggete qui di seguito, in basso, e per intero: giudicate voi. Non merita da parte nostra un commento sui contenuti: l’articolo di Fubini è, semplicemente, un ennesima conferma del ruolo della stampa in Italia quando si parla di risparmio e di investimenti. Un ruolo servile. Che da sempre fa l’interesse delle Reti di promozione finanziaria (Mediolanum, Fideuram, Generali, FINECO e le altre) e delle banche grandi come Intesa, Unicredit, UBI e le altre (Istituzioni che pagano la pubblicità sui quotidiani, e banche che tengono in vita i quotidiani in perdita grazie a “buoni rapporti di amicizia”). Mai, ma proprio mai, viene fatto l’interesse dell’investitore finale, che sia esso una famiglia oppure un’Istituzione. Un panorama triste e desolante, squallido.

Neppure una riga dei media nazionali sui Fondi Comuni che saltano per aria, neppure un commento, neppure un filo di rispetto per quei risparmiatori che hanno creduto ai promotori finanziari oppure a certi consulenti che selezionano i “migliori Fondi Comuni di Investimento” o peggio ancora “i migliori ETF”. Zero: la regola è fare finta di nulla. L’ipocrisia fatta a mestiere, un mestiere ben misero.

Naturalmente, in onda sulla medesima rete, trovate quelli che ridono perché “i dati dall’economia peggiorano ed i mercati salgono”: li vedete nell’immagine in fondo.

di Federico Fubini

Si può definire Larry Fink l’uomo di finanza più potente al mondo senza che nessuno si offenda. Trentuno anni fa, allora trentacinquenne, questo figlio di un negoziante di scarpe di Los Angeles ha fondato la sua azienda. Oggi BlackRock gestisce 6.500 miliardi di dollari dei clienti, pari a tre volte e mezzo il prodotto lordo italiano. Questa settimana Fink riunisce il «board» di BlackRock a Milano e ne approfitta per parlare con molti capi azienda nel Paese.

Lei ricorda spesso i salari stagnanti, i posti persi a causa della tecnologia e la rabbia populista che ne nasce. Si sente coinvolto?

«Tutti vogliono un futuro positivo. Ma nella società si sono diffusi timori: si comprende che in gran parte delle democrazie i governi oggi sono meno attrezzati per rispondere alle attese. E con le aziende che diventano sempre più grandi, più globali, più monumentali, la società mette più pressione su di loro. Per me e per noi di BlackRock rappresentare gli interessi dei nostri clienti è una responsabilità enorme. Ma è chiaro che in Europa e anche in Italia c’è costantemente una visione a breve termine».

Che intende dire?
«Gli europei hanno una visione più a breve rispetto ad altre parti del mondo». In che senso? «Nel modo in cui investite. Gli italiani, i francesi, i tedeschi. Mettete i vostri risparmi in un conto in banca, anche se ci sono tassi negativi».

In Italia le famiglie tengono così 1.360 miliardi.
«E lei come reporter dovrebbe scrivere che è una rovina. Una delle ragioni per cui l’Europa non migliora è che tutti questi soldi stanno dormendo, non sono al lavoro attivamente per i risparmiatori. Per questo credo sia più difficile in Europa che in America per la politica monetaria tradursi in un impatto economico positivo. E per questo l’Europa ha bisogno di più politica di bilancio».

Vuole dire, espansiva?
«Specialmente in Germania, sì, per stimolare». 
Alcuni però dicono che altrove, specie in Italia, non c’è spazio per aumentare l’investimento pubblico.

«No, l’Italia non ha quello spazio, chiaramente. Ma la Germania sì e dovrebbe essere leader in questo. Del resto abbiamo un problema simile anche in Cina, dove il tasso di risparmio è al 35% e il Paese dipende tanto dall’export. Ora che questo è in calo, i cinesi hanno bisogno di più crescita dall’interno».

Lei parla di «spirito animatore» e «scopo» di un’azienda, che contano come gli utili. Che intende?
«Pensi a Apple. Puoi comprare un prodotto meno caro, ovvio. Ma io posso dire che credo in ciò che fa Apple, in ciò che rappresenta. Penso di essere un consumatore normale e sono molto consapevole delle aziende da cui compro. Potrei nominarne alcune da cui non comprerei nulla, perché non credo in quel che fanno o perché sono di un Paese sleale nel commercio. Questo desiderio di scegliere sui valori è una tendenza diffusa, specie fra i millennials».

Porterà a una maggiore concentrazione a vantaggio di poche grandi imprese?
«Succederà. Sta già succedendo. Ci saranno meno aziende con una presa e un ruolo più ampi nella società. Per questo dovranno avere una voce più forte».

Perché lei propone che si producano dati sull’impatto delle attività economiche sull’ambiente?
«Ne abbiamo bisogno per provare che gli investimenti in imprese che rispettano obiettivi ambientali o di sostenibilità producono risultati e rendimenti validi. Senza dati, si potrebbe generare una bolla sugli investimenti definiti sostenibili. Anche perché non ci possiamo permettere di avere un pianeta più pulito a costi socialmente regressivi».

La transizione all’energia pulita non deve pesare sui ceti medio-bassi?«Esatto. E mi fa paura che l’Europa non abbia una rete elettrica continentale. Il Nord Europa produce un surplus di idroelettrico. Eppure l’Europa dipende così tanto dal gas russo, malgrado la quantità disponibile da Israele, l’Egitto o Cipro. Perché secondo lei non si costruisce un gasdotto lì?». 

Il costo del gas russo non è noto, i contratti sono segreti.
«Si stima stiate pagando quasi 10 dollari per unità di prodotto, mentre in America è fra 2 o 2,5. C’è un gasdotto fra l’Algeria e la Spagna, ma finisce ai Pirenei. Perché? È un problema. Israele e l’Egitto erano più vicine della Russia, l’ultima volta che ho guardato la cartina!».

Oltre l’uso del risparmio, cosa consiglia all’Italia per uscire dalla crescita zero?
«Non è un destino! Direi le stesse cose che dico ai giapponesi, che hanno gli stessi problemi dell’Italia: bassa crescita, demografia debole. Sono ottimista sul Giappone, un leader globale nella robotica, perché rappresenta la prova di come una società evolve con la tecnologia. Accettate il fatto che avrete meno lavoratori, trasformatelo in un vantaggio. Invece di essere una bomba a orologeria, la demografia in declino può spingere un Paese ad adattarsi più in fretta al cambio tecnologico. Più produttività significa anche salari più alti. Questo è il tipo di programmazione che serve, non si cambiano i comportamenti in un giorno».

week_02_July_2019_036.png
Banche Centrali: il 2019 è un anno che resterà nella Storia
 

Recce’d nel suo Blog pubblica unicamente cose utili: spunti, dati e notizie che il lettore possa utilizzare nelle sue scelte di investimento.

Abituati a leggere, sui media tradizionali, lunghi articoli “contenitore” dove con un abile “tagli ed incolla” si affiancano temi che tra loro hanno poco o nulla in comune, per poi arrivare a conclusioni che lasciano tutte le strade aperte (non si sa mai ..) così che il lettore poi si trova punto e d’accapo, i lettori purtroppo spesso scelgono di rinunciare, di non capire, di lasciare che le cose seguano il loro corso senza reagire.

Lo scopo dei nostri Post è invece quello di offrire al lettore segnali concreti, riferimenti precisi, cose che si possono utilizzare: e tutto questo senza spendere troppe parole.

In negativo, un esempio lo possiamo offrire a proposito delle Banche Centrali: per le quali, ormai è nei fatti, il 2019 costituisce un anno di svolta. E non stiamo parlando della recente svolta ad U sui tassi ufficiali di interesse, bensì della svolta storica, epocale, nella natura stessa della Banca Centrale.

Questo è proprio un tema sul quale non ci è possibile offrire contributi concreti: ne scrivono tutti, ne scrivono tanto, e ormai è chiaro che si ridiscute tutto: gli obbiettivi (inflazione, crescita, uguaglianza, investimenti, e chi più ne ha più ne metta), gli strumenti (i tassi, i finanziamenti diretti al sistema bancario, il QE … e persino MMT), e gli stessi uomini (in Europa è recente la scelta di un politico come Lagarde al vertice della BCE, mentre negli Stati Uniti è da tempo aperta e pubblica la corsa a sostituire Powell, e sono note alcune auto-candidature come Bullard e Kashkari).

Tutto questo è importante, per chi investe? E’ importantissimo. Ma che cosa abbiamo noi da dire, al proposito? Nulla.

week_04_july_2019_016.png

Per ciò che riguarda l’immediato, è nei fatti che la politica monetaria ultra-espansiva, quella dei tagli dei tassi, non serve a rilanciare la crescita dell’economia, ed al contrario la deprime: abbiamo documentato questa affermazione con centinaia di dati, e quello del grafico qui sopra è solo uno dei moltissimi che noi abbiamo a disposizione. Soltanto chi è distratto, oppure ottuso, può continuare a credere che i tagli dei tassi ufficiali nel 2019 potrebbero “rilanciare la crescita economica”.

Sia chiaro, neppure Trump ci crede: lui punta solo a fare scrivere sui quotidiani di “nuovi record” a Wall Street” e questo soltanto allo scopo di essere rieletto l’anno prossimo. Nessuno più di lui ha paura di un crollo, e lo dimostra in modo chiarissimo.

Per ciò che riguarda invece il medio termine, risulta chiaro a tutti che in questo 2019 si punta in modo deciso a mettere le Banche Centrali al di sotto del potere dei Governi in carica: ne abbiamo scritto in modo diffuso anche su SoldiOnline.it, spiegando che questa è una altra ragione, tra le tante, per la quale gli investitori, tutto ma in particolare quelli che investono in modo tradizionale, debbono guardare, oggi e subito, ai propri portafogli con grande preoccupazione ed in modo molto critico, per poi precedere subito all’azione che li metta al riparo dagli effetti di una ormai inevitabile svolta che penalizzerà tutti i mercati finanziari.

Noi non abbiamo altro da dire (che non sia stato da noi già detto, e in modo forte, negli anni precedenti al 2019). Vi lasciamo però alla lettura di un articolo che contiene mote informazioni ed osservazioni che vi potranno essere utili per comprendere ciò che vedete in questi giorni.

The facts have changed, but the Federal Reserve sure doesn’t seem like it is changing its mind.

The central bank has signaled that it is all but certain to cut interest rates at its policy meeting later this month—so much so that the debate among investors has moved on to how big the cut will be and when the central bank will cut next. Yet as the Fed has been busy sharpening its shears, its reasons for cutting rates have become less and less compelling.

A couple of reports Tuesday added to the evidence. First, the Commerce Department reported that retail sales rose 0.4% in June from May. That was better than the 0.1% economists had expected, and would have been stronger still if it hadn’t been for a 2.8% decline in gasoline-station sales driven by lower fuel prices. Consumer spending now looks to have grown at a 4.3% annual rate in the second quarter, according to forecasting firm Macroeconomic Advisers, which would count as the fastest pace since 2014.

Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve reported that manufacturing output increased by 0.4% in June from May. That allays concerns that, confronted by trade uncertainty and weakness overseas, factories are sharply cutting back.

Throw in the strong June jobs report, the recent detente on trade between the U.S. and China and a stock market that has lately reached new records, and it is a little hard to remember what the Fed’s fuss was about. Still, the central bank has a plan to cut rates, and its argument for doing so will hinge on two factors.

First, there is still the potential for trade tensions and global uncertainty to damage the economy, and it may be just a matter of time for those things to show up in the data. So doing some insurance cuts may make sense. Second, inflation is running below the Fed’s 2% target, increasing the risk that too-low inflation gets ingrained into consumer expectations. So the economy arguably could use a little stimulating to get prices running hotter.

Whatever the merits of those arguments might be, cutting rates now seems out of step with what the Fed has done in the past. Financial markets certainly don’t seem like they are in any kind of distress, nor has the American jobs machine started to sputter.

William McChesney Martin, the Fed chairman in the 1950s and 1960s, quipped that the Fed’s job is “to take away the punch bowl just as the party gets going.” Today’s Fed plans to spike the punch instead.

Maurizio Crozza, vieni ad aiutarci
 

Non troviamo più le parole per descrivere le nostre giornate sui mercati finanziari: stiamo assistendo ad una farsa, ma una farsa che non fa ridere.

Ci servirebbero le capacità umoristiche proprie dei grandi comici, che trasformano una tragedia in una commedia, ma noi non le abbiamo. E quindi, rimaniamo ai fatti.

Dunque, il signore della fotografia qui sotto si chiama John Williams, ed è potentissimo. Si trova oggi a capo di una sede regionale della Federal Reserve, ma è una sede specialissima: è quella di New York. Un uomo molto potente, specie per i mercati finanziari.

week_04_july_2019_029.png

E quando, giovedì 18 luglio, le agenzie di stampa pubblicano una sua frase, l’eco sui mercati è molto ampia: dice Williams che “quando il livello dei tassi è molto basso, allora occorre procedere a tagli più ampi se si vuole avere un effetto”.

I mercati, immediatamente, ci vedono un annuncio: ovvero che nella riunione del 30-31 luglio la Federal Reserve procederà ad un “taglio più ampio”.

Notate che l’indice S&P 500 era appena sceso sotto i 3000 punti, ed ha poi chiuso la seduta sopra i 3000 punti.

Va aggiunto che nelle medesime ore anche da Richard Clarida, numero 2 alla Federal Reserve, erano arrivati altri segnali “accomodanti”.

week_04_july_2019_015.png

Ed ecco che, poche ore dopo, parte il caos: Williams dice che la sua intenzione non era quella di anticipare l’esito della prossima riunione. Spiega che si trattava, semplicemente, di uno studio accademico, di un elaborato statistico, e non di un annuncio di politica monetaria.

(Come se Williams non sapesse di essere seguito, e citato, quotidianamente da decine di media).

Come leggete sopra nella prima immagine, questa retromarcia risulta molto pasticciata, e sui media si parla, in modo aperto, della “debacle di Williams”. Sui mercati è il caos: in 24 ore, la probabilità di un taglio dello 0,50% alla riunione di fine luglio sale dal 25% al 75% e poi scende al 22%. Stiamo parlando di soldi veri, guadagnati da qualcuno e persi da qualcuno.

Trump, a quel punto, non crede ai propri occhi, si esalta e scorge subito l’opportunità: e spara fuori altri tre dei suoi ormai quotidiani Tweet contro la Federal Reserve, nei quali spiega (lui economista sopraffino) come dovrebbe funzionare la politica monetaria. Torna ovviamente a chiedere i tagli dei tassi, cosa che stupisce sempre di più visto che lo stesso Trump continua a ripetere che l’economia degli Stati Uniti è in forma eccellente.

Tutti questi individui esercitano alte responsabilità, eppure ogni giorno che passa a noi investitori tocca di assistere ad uno spettacolo che li vede in scena come attori comici, in una farsa che però non fa ridere.

week_04_july_2019_012.png
week_04_july_2019_013.png
S&P 3000? E' proprio soltanto "fake news"
 

Recce’d nel suo Blog pubblica unicamente cose utili: spunti, dati e notizie che il lettore possa utilizzare nelle sue scelte di investimento.

Abituati a leggere, sui media tradizionali, lunghi articoli “contenitore” dove con un abile “tagli ed incolla” si affiancano temi che tra loro hanno poco o nulla in comune, per poi arrivare a conclusioni che lasciano tutte le strade aperte (non si sa mai ..) così che il lettore poi si trova punto e d’accapo, i lettori purtroppo spesso scelgono di rinunciare, di non capire, di lasciare che le cose seguano il loro corso senza reagire.

Lo scopo dei nostri Post è invece quello di offrire al lettore segnali concreti, riferimenti precisi, cose che si possono utilizzare: e tutto questo senza spendere troppe parole.

Un esempio: abbiamo scritto sette giorni fa che quota 3000 dell’indice S&P 500 della Borsa di New York è soltanto parte del sistema delle “fake news”. Questa nostra conclusione rimarrà leggibile, qui nel Blog, per anni, e quindi sarà verificabile, ed anche utilizzabile da chi ci volesse attaccare.

Nella settimana tra il 15 ed il 19 luglio, sono arrivati dati molto precisi, e significativi, ed importantissimi, che sono un decisivo supporto per la nostra affermazione. Li vedete nel grafico sotto.

week_04_july_2019_021.png

Lo ripetiamo: è da ingenui ritenere che i mercati finanziari siano fatti da tantissimi piccolissimi omini, ognuno che opera per conto proprio coi sui soldini. I mercati finanziari, in tutto il Mondo, sono fatti da individui ma pure da Istituzione, ed ognuna di essere ha i propri obbiettivi di budget da raggiungere.

Quando questi obbiettivi non vengono raggiunti, i dipendenti soffrono ed hanno paura, e le provano tutte, ma proprio tutte, per raggiungerli.

Come ad esempio è successo in Lehman Brothers, ani fa, ed in Deutsche Bank: due episodi che abbiamo analizzato la settimana scorsa in The Morning Brief, e che saranno seguiti poi da altri episodi analoghi.

Performances 2019: fare quello che dice la Fed?
week_04_july_2019_027.png

Recce’d nel suo Blog pubblica unicamente cose utili: spunti, dati e notizie che il lettore possa utilizzare nelle sue scelte di investimento.

Abituati a leggere, sui media tradizionali, lunghi articoli “contenitore” dove con un abile “tagli ed incolla” si affiancano temi che tra loro hanno poco o nulla in comune, per poi arrivare a conclusioni che lasciano tutte le strade aperte (non si sa mai ..) così che il lettore poi si trova punto e d’accapo, i lettori purtroppo spesso scelgono di rinunciare, di non capire, di lasciare che le cose seguano il loro corso senza reagire.

Lo scopo dei nostri Post è invece quello di offrire al lettore segnali concreti, riferimenti precisi, cose che si possono utilizzare: e tutto questo senza spendere troppe parole.

In questo Post trovate un esempio concreto.

A molti piacere ricorrere (quando non trovano più argomenti) ad un vecchio ritornello, che dice “Dont’ fight the Fed”, ovvero non investire in modo diversa da come ti dice di fare la Banca Centrale.

Bella soluzione: metto il cervello in soffitta, innesto il pilota automatico, e mi rilasso. tanto, non rischio nulla: me lo ha detto la Fed, di chi dovrei fidarmi? Chi c’è al Mondo di più potente?

Peccato che poi si leggano titoli come quello qui in alto. Che ci arriva da un quotidiano che non soltanto è autorevole e prestigioso, ma che di certo non si schiera contro la Federal Reserve, oppure contro il Presidente Trump, oppure più in generale contro i rialzi delle Borse, la bolla, l’establishment.

La domanda ai lettori è questa: ma se alla Fed non sanno più quello che fanno, allora CHE COSA dovremmo seguire, delle indicazioni che ci arrivano (ormai ogni giorno) dalla Federal Reserve?

Questo dimenticatevelo. Ovvero: l'errore più grande.
 

Non sappiamo se ci sarà una discesa dei mercati, lunedì, la settimana prossima, oppure nel prossimo semestre o anno.

Una cosa sola sappiamo: ed è che se ci fosse una discesa non sarebbe del 10%: siamo oggi una una situazione da “o la va o la spacca” nella quale, come avete visto con chiarezza nell’ultima settimana, le Banche Centrali ed i Governi si giocano il tutto per tutto.

Lo scopo è sempre lo stesso: tenere tutto in piedi anche se aumentano gli scricchiolii, fare salire le Borse soprattutto quando i dati peggiorano, e comperare così altro tempo.

Ma ultimamente, per una serie di cause diverse che vanno dalla debolezza dell’economia alla crisi oggettiva del settore Finanza fino alle scadenze elettorali 2020, è evidentissimo il panico nelle mosse dei principali attori in scena.

E quindi, vedete cosa dice Morgan Stanley qui sotto? Ecco, quello potete proprio dimenticarvelo. Se c’è una sola cosa sicura, oggi, è che le cose NON andranno in quel modo. Per tutto il resto … vedete un po’ voi cosa fare e quando.

week_04_july_2019_009.png
L'errore più grande da evitare nel 2019
 

Come abbiamo scritto già sette giorni fa, sui mercati la situazione è chiarissima ed una ulteriore analisi ci obbligherebbe a ripetere cose già dette e scritte.

E oggi notiamo che aumenta il numero di chi si sposta su posizioni di “prudenza” per la seconda metà del 2019.

Ci capita, però, di leggere ed ascoltare un numero crescente di commenti che puntano tutto sulla “correzione”.

In sostanza, si dice al Cliente che è necessario essere prudenti, e che le cose non necessariamente andranno bene. Al tempo stesso, però, si dice che se ci saranno problemi, saranno problemi limitati e quindi facilmente gestibili.

Questo a nostro giudizio è il più grande degli errori che un investitore finale può fare, nel 2019.

L’investitore deve avere chiaro, come minimo, il quadro che si trova di fronte agli occhi: e quindi oggi deve avere chiarissimo che le improvvise, brusche e fino ad oggi non spiegate svolte ad U delle Banche Centrali sono mosse che denunciano un profondo stato di difficoltà.

Sono mosse disperate, sono scommesse al buio di tipo “all in”. Cari lettori, sappiatelo: se per caso funziona, allora tutto ok, e magari … andiamo a 3500. Ma se NON funzionasse, allora quello che vedrete NON sarà una “correzione del 10%” per gli indici di Borsa.

Se non lo avete capito, amici lettori, ve lo spieghiamo noi: Trump, Powell e Draghi stanno giocando al gioco de “o la va, o la spacca”.

I nostri portafogli sono prontissimi. E il vostro?

week_03_july_2019_012.png